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Thread: Assorted Projects in the Shed

  1. #1
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    Assorted Projects in the Shed

    Continuing on from the old forum.

    http://www.sr500forum.com/forum/view...19af71e1344047

    Well, the Christmas New Year holiday period didn't see a real lot achieve with the various project bike in the shed, however;

    I bought a replica seat cover out of SE Asian for the '87 XT250T Yamaha (not fitted in the picture below) and it is now completed and registered for the road. I have ridden about 250km on it so far and it is a delightful little bike and should be a whole heap of fun to ride in the coming Reliability Trial series.

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    The '77 YB100 is almost ready for registration, I an just waiting for a few bit to come from SE Asia, mainly a new seat (Thailand) and a LH switch block / clutch lever assy (Indonesia). I also have a set of mirrors and a few other little bits coming from Yambits in the UK. Hopefully they will arrive in the next few weeks now that the holidays are over. I have taken it for a quick test ride (without a clutch lever) and it feels like it will be a fun bike to ride. It will just be a case of remembering that it has a upside down gear shift with Neutral at the top and 4 gear all down.

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    The '73 Suzuki RV125 restoration has progressed a little over the pasted few months. I have assembled the frame and yesterday I managed to get the top end back on the engine and have replaced the buggered gear selector shaft with the one from the pare engine. I have been promised by the powder coater that the wheels will be ready next week, so with a bit of luck it will be up on its wheels next weekend.

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    The '72 Honda Sl125 is still the bane of my existence. Before Christmas I fitted a brand new ignition coil, condenser and points without any improvement to the situation, it still won't rev above 2500 -3000 rpm.

    Some joy has been had this weekend. On Thursday I picked up the OEM 18"rim that I took to the chrome plates in November. I did stuff up when I dropped it off and didn't give good instructions, so I got a full Show Quality plating job. It looks magnificent, but at $270 was a lot more expensive that the normal $80 I pay to have my rims chromed to a lower industrial standard, ah well, you live and learn! Anyway, I spent some time yesterday and polished up and sealed another rear hub, I have been trying product call "Shine Seal" which is supposed to prevent oxidisation of bare / polished aluminium. One I get the SL on the road it will be interesting to see how the polished ally parts hold there shine.

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    I have spent a relaxing afternoon relacing / truing the the wheel, and the bike is now fitted with a correct 18"rear wheel instead of the 17"wheel that I build by mistake in October. The down side to the 18" rear wheel is that the side stand is now too short, as it is off of a SL100, which runs the smaller wheels sizes.

  2. #2
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    Re: SL125
    Just a thought as I had a similar issue with a TL125.
    Remove the carb and then the slide. Look carefully at the jet needle and needle jet. These parts tend to wear and you can see that the Needle jet is worn quite oval. If such is the case then the engine runs so rich as it comes on the needle that it just bogs out.

  3. #3
    Some shiny things there Col...good to see the YB is almost there too.

    SR
    ...'Any unnecessary items on the bike, that it doesn't really need, shouldn't be there!'. (Café racers creed). SR..

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmonk View Post
    Re: SL125
    Just a thought as I had a similar issue with a TL125.
    Remove the carb and then the slide. Look carefully at the jet needle and needle jet. These parts tend to wear and you can see that the Needle jet is worn quite oval. If such is the case then the engine runs so rich as it comes on the needle that it just bogs out.
    When rebuilt it I fitted a jet kit in the carbie. When I first fired it up and found the no rev problem, I actually tried the carbies off of my TL125 and XL100 to see if it was a carbie problem, and even fitted the original jets back into the carbie, all with no change to the ability to rev pasted the 2500 - 3000 rpm mark. Having said that, now that I have replaced the ignition bits with new parts, I am going to going to revisit the carbie as a source of the problem when I get some time, I might even make it an Australia Day project and have a look tomorrow since the wife is working away and I will have the day to myself.

  5. #5
    Just a thought. My SR ran like that when the advance wasn't coming in. Can you check the timing with a light?

    Doug

  6. #6
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    Well, a big day yesterday working on the SL125, and I have found the problem. Excessive wear on the camshaft journals and a bit of wear in the bearing surface in the head (NDE).

    First up I tried the SL carbie on my 1976 TL125S, and it ran great and reved out correctly, proving that it wasn't a carbie problem.

    Next step was to swap the ignition advance unit (again) with some of my spares, but it still wouldn't rev.

    I have always known that there was some wear on the camshaft journals and in the head (worn cam journals and bearing surface inside the head are a common problem with these early Honda singles) but since the bike ran ok (ish) before I pulled it down, I didn't see it as a major issue, especially as it would idle and run well at low revs after the rebuild. I pulled the points cover etc from the engine and with the cam chain removed could move the end of the can up/down about 1 - 2mm. Pulling the camshaft out, I measured the journals and found that although the journal on the Drive End (DE) of the cam was quite good, there was a fair bit (0.2mm) of wear on the Opposite Drive End (ODE) journal. So it looked like the cam was "rocking" due to the wear at the ODE.

    Fortunately, I have the wreck of a 1973 TL125 that has the same one piece head. I dragged it out of storage and removed the cam from it to check that it wasn't stuffed. It had some wear but was in better condition that the SL camshaft. The only problem was the timing pin was in a different location to the SL timing pin. Anyway, with a bit of mix and match, I had the TL cam installed in the SL, and the timing issues resolved by building up an advance unit from a combination of TL and SL parts.

    Although I couldn't get the engine to idle with the TL cam and bodged advance unit, and it was harder to start that before, it would rev out with a bit of miss firing.

    I have found and bought a NOS SL camshaft on Ebay (in Thailand) and will see if the new camshaft on its own will fix the problem. If it still won't run properly, I will pull the head off of the TL engine which has very little wear in the bearings, overhaul this head and fit it onto the SL.

    Oh the joy of restoring 40 plus year old Japanese trail bikes.

  7. #7
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    I picked up the 2nd batch of powder coating for the RV125 project during the week. Unfortunately, the colour was more grey than the metallic silver I was after, especially when compared to the silver paint on the engine covers. I carried out a small experimental repaint on the exhaust heat shield that goes behind the exhaust to protect the under seat fuel tank using that same VHT silver engine enamal and baked it in the oven I have in the shed. After baking / curing for 1hr at 100C it had had no adverse reactions with the powder coating beneath, so I went a head and sprayed all the other parts with the VHT silver, baking them all in the oven to cure the paint. With the rims, hubs and other parts all not silver, I have assembled the wheels and finally gotten it to look something like a bike again.

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    Progress will slow down a bit with it now as I really need to get all the chrome done before progression much further, but there is not enough in the secret stash to pay for the plating at present.

    Stew, I have recieved the reproduction seat for the YB100, and the quality is quiet good for a reproduction out of Thailand. Just need to get the recieve the clutch lever / switch block assy and it will be a goer.

  8. #8
    Good stuff Col...on both counts...if you need someone to fix up the head cam journals maybe give the junior speedway guys a call. They've been using these engines for many years and should have it all sorted by now.

    They probably use Chinese engines by now of course...

    SR
    ...'Any unnecessary items on the bike, that it doesn't really need, shouldn't be there!'. (Café racers creed). SR..

  9. #9
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    A happy day today!

    This morning I loaded the YB100 onto the ute and made the 200km round trip to Kadina to have the police do an Identification / Stolen Vehicle Check on it and to register it. The cop told me that it was last registered in 1986, he was also able to tell me the original registration number, unfortunately, the registration office could not find any record of the YB on their system, so I had to get a new, modern registration number.

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    The all up cost of getting the YB re-commissioned was about $500 (AUS). This doesn't count in the $57 for the ID/SV check or the $116 for the rego and new number plate.

    So, after just on 30 years off the road the YB100 is back in action.

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    I have taken it for a short 30km shakedown run on my favorite twist back roads and it is a blast to ride and I have had it to 90kph (on the speedo). It is so similar, yet so different to my 1964 Honda S90 to ride. Both bikes are so small and light that they react instantly to any body movement and with turn on the proverbial dime. But performance wise, the Honda is quite linear with its power delivery (i.e. flat) and just slowly gathers speed, where as the YB has a distinct power band, and once you reach the magic rpm, it just picks up it skirt and goes. However, it is going to take a while to get used to the upside down, neutral at the top, down for up gear shift pattern. I have lost count of the number of times I have changed up, when I was trying to change down a gear and vise versa.

    Over the next week I will put a few more km’s on it to make sure that I don’t make a complete ass of myself on the VJMC Tiddler Run on the 13th.

  10. #10
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    Nice looking job, well done.

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